Body Creams and Lotions

No matter whether your skin type is dry, oily or sensitive, you shouldn't skip the moisturizing step in your skin care routine. Leaving it out might quickly cause redness or flaking, and in time it can allow wrinkles and other aging signs to show up on your skin earlier than they otherwise might. Also, if you have sensitive skin or a skin condition, moisturizing regularly might help ease some of the irritation.

To get the most out of your moisturizer, first prime your skin. While in the shower, use a loofah or an exfoliating body scrub a few times a week to exfoliate. Removing dead skin cells before adding a moisturizing lotion or cream may help your skin absorb the product and increase hydration.  Then, within three minutes of getting out of the bath or shower, apply lotion to trap the moisture on your skin. By adding this step to your regular routine, you can ditch dry, itchy skin for good.

 

Lotions are applied to external skin with bare hands, a brush, a clean cloth, cotton wool, or gauze. While lotion may be used as a medicine delivery system, many lotions, especially hand lotions and body lotions are meant instead simply smooth, moisturize and soften the skin. These may be used in anti-aging lotions, which can also be classified as a cosmetic in many cases, and may contain fragrances. The Food and Drug Administration voiced concern about lotions not classified as drugs that advertise anti-aging or anti-wrinkle properties. 

Dermatologists can prescribe lotions to treat or prevent skin diseases. It is not unusual for the same drug ingredient to be formulated into a lotion, cream and ointment. Creams are the most convenient of the three but are inappropriate for application to regions of hairy skin such as the scalp, while a lotion is less viscous and may be readily applied to these areas (many medicated shampoos are in fact lotions). Historically, lotions also had an advantage in that they may be spread thinly compared to a cream or ointment and may economically cover a large area of skin, but product research has steadily eroded this distinction. Non-comedogenic lotions are recommended for use on acne prone skin.